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photo - Ted Hein '08

photo – Ted Hein ’08

Red-footed boobies (Sula sula) are not as cute as their blue-footed relatives, but are far friendlier. They nest in trees, grasping branches with their prehensile, webbed feet. As we walked around the islands, we saw dozens of these birds sitting in the low bushes. In this photo, you can see how my daughter was less than a foot away from this bird while taking its photo. It seemed amused by us and sat still to be photographed.

photo - Ted Hein '08

photo – Ted Hein ’08

The red-footed boobies are found in all tropical oceans around the world. In Galapagos, the majority of the birds you see have mostly brown plumage with unmistakably vivid red, webbed feet. The red-footed bobby has a beautiful face with a sky-blue bill with a pink flush between the eyes and around the chin. Of the three species of boobies found in the Galapagos Islands, the red-footed boobies are the smallest and are the most numerous of the three species of boobies in the Galapagos Islands with an estimated population of over a quarter-million individuals. They feed out at sea primarily on squid and flying fish.  They tend to travel away from the islands to dive for food so they have a consistent food supply and can brood more freely throughout the year.

Source material:

National Geographic
Galapagos Seabirds


Would you like to be part of Midge & Snig’s adventure in the Galapagos? Want to have your name (or any name you choose) in my next book? From now until the end of April, everyone who follows my blog, signs up for my newsletter, or leaves a comment, will be entered in a drawing for the chance to name the cruise ship featured in the book.

This post in part of the AtoZ Challenge. Please click on the sunflower AtoZ icon in the sidebar to go to the official list of participating blogs. This year my theme is the Galapagos Islands. I am in the process of writing the first of my Midge & Snig mystery series set in the islands. In my research, I have come across a plethora of interesting facts and images. The vast majority of my research won’t get included in the book, but it’s fun to share what I’ve learned with you all.

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