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The character of Dr. Reginald Obatu was one of the few characters in How To Climb The Eiffel Tower that I modeled on a real person. When I imagined a kind, soft spoken physician, I immediately thought of my former neighbor, Dr. O. He is a endocrinologist specializing fertility issues. I met him once for about an hour at a block party, but he stuck in my memory as the type of doctor you’d want when facing something like infertility. From there, I created a five page backstory for Dr. Obatu. I knew he came to the United States to study medicine in hopes of going back to his native Africa and helping the women who had been brutalized by the ongoing wars there. I thought about how he fell in love with his charming wife, Christina, in medical school and changed his ambitions to include a life with her and their three children in North Carolina, instead of central Africa. In the end, all that backstory was boiled down to two sentences spoken by his nurse to make a point. Even though next to none of it ended up on the page, I still feel developing the character was worth the effort.

Do you write extensive backstories for your characters? When you read, can you sense that the author knows far more about the characters than is in the text? Does that enrich the reading experience?

Other characters: Lara Blaine, Mama, Jane Babcock-Roberts, Garlic Breath

THIS POST IS PART OF THE BLOGGING FROM A TO Z CHALLENGE. FOR THE 2014 CHALLENGE, I WILL BE HIGHLIGHTING BITS AND PIECES OF RESEARCH AND BACKGROUND ON MY UPCOMING NOVEL, HOW TO CLIMB THE EIFFEL TOWER. PLEASE CLICK HERE OR ON THE BADGE TO THE LEFT TO SEE THE HUNDREDS OF OTHER PARTICIPATING BLOGS.

 

The cover for How To Climb The Eiffel Tower will be officially revealed on May 1, 2014

I’m so excited, that I am giving away an Advanced Reader Copy of the book along with a small Eiffel Tower charm (you’ll understand why once you read the book). Visit my Facebook author page or clink on the link to enter now – Cover Reveal Giveaway

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