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Come, hearken then, ere voice of dread,
With bitter tidings laden,
Shall summon to unwelcome bed
A melancholy maiden!
We are but older children, dear,
Who fret to find our bedtime near.
Lewis Carroll

Nightmares are common in survivors of child abuse. Like a cruel trick, the survivor relives the trauma of abuse in their sleep for years after the abuse has ended. Therapists have found that prolonged exposure therapy can help survivors deal with the nightmares. By talking through their memories with a trained therapist, the survivor can blunt the memories and move forward with their lives.

Lara Blaine, the main character in How To Climb The Eiffel Tower, has vivid, frightening nightmares. At different points in the novel, she dreams that she is being held down by a table of hands, being drowned in bloody tears, and running through a burning forest. Her nightmares are her way of working through the things that are scaring her at that point.

Do you ever have nightmares? Do you know what they mean? Do you try to figure them out or try to forget them as quickly as possible?

Additional resources: Surviving the memories, Dealing with nightmares and flashbacks, nightmares.

THIS POST IS PART OF THE BLOGGING FROM A TO Z CHALLENGE. FOR THE 2014 CHALLENGE, I WILL BE HIGHLIGHTING BITS AND PIECES OF RESEARCH AND BACKGROUND ON MY UPCOMING NOVEL, HOW TO CLIMB THE EIFFEL TOWER. PLEASE CLICK HERE OR ON THE BADGE TO THE LEFT TO SEE THE HUNDREDS OF OTHER PARTICIPATING BLOGS.

 

The cover for How To Climb The Eiffel Tower will be officially revealed on May 1, 2014

I am giving away an Advanced Reader Copy of the book along with a small Eiffel Tower charm (you’ll understand why once you read the book). Visit my Facebook author page or clink on the link to enter now – Cover Reveal Giveaway

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