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Jane Babcock-Roberts is the second main character in How To Climb The Eiffel Tower. She a successful businesswoman in her sixties who is diagnosed with lung cancer the same day that Lara Blaine (the main character) is diagnosed with cancer. The shared experience of receiving a life changing diagnosis binds the two women in a unique friendship. Jane becomes a surrogate mother figure in Lara’s life, giving her advice and encouraging her to pursue new experiences. As Lara recovers from her cancer treatments, Jane withers.

As I was writing the novel, Jane threatened to take over the narrative. I wrote several scenes where I wanted her to be motherly toward Lara. Jane refused to do that. None of those scenes worked at all. I finally got tired of wrestling with the character and spent a few days free writing around those scenes. I knew for the larger plot, I needed  Lara to see Jane as a confidante and mentor, but realized Jane could be those things to Lara without being overly affectionate. Instead, those scenes involve Jane lecturing Lara on how to order the appropriate cocktail for a business meeting and regaling Lara with stories of her world travels.

Writer friends, have you ever had a character take over the narrative and tell you how they would or wouldn’t act? How did that work out? Was the piece better for it?


The cover for How To Climb The Eiffel Tower will be officially revealed on May 1, 2014

I’m so excited, that I am giving away an Advanced Reader Copy of the book along with a small Eiffel Tower charm (you’ll understand why once you read the book). Visit my Facebook author page or clink on the link to enter now – Cover Reveal Giveaway

THIS POST IS PART OF THE BLOGGING FROM A TO Z CHALLENGE. FOR THE 2014 CHALLENGE, I WILL BE HIGHLIGHTING BITS AND PIECES OF RESEARCH AND BACKGROUND ON MY UPCOMING NOVEL, HOW TO CLIMB THE EIFFEL TOWER. PLEASE CLICK HERE OR ON THE BADGE TO THE LEFT TO SEE THE HUNDREDS OF OTHER PARTICIPATING BLOGS.

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